I feel like I’ve gone into a rut of only creating cards for design team work, and not participating in as many of the other online challenges as I would like. After lunch today I told myself I was going to break out of that and try something new.  I saw that the Less is More challenge that’s ending in a little while was to use texture.  So I decided to give it a go.

Over the last few years I’ve seen a number of cards that use embossing paste for texture, and I like the way they look.  Unfortunately, embossing paste is not easy to find in the few craft stores in my area.  I’d read that drywall compound can be used in its place.  So a while ago when we were doing some small home repairs, I scooped some drywall compound out of the big bucket my husband had bought, and put it and a damp paper towel in a small container and set it aside in my craft room.  This afternoon it took me a few minutes to remember where I’d put that small container, but when I found it, I was glad to see that compound was still moist enough to be workable.  I decided to use a floral stencil with the compound.  Since the compound is white, I chose to put it on ivory cardstock for a subtle difference in color.  I had a sheet of ivory cardstock already cut in half, so I cut it to give me a piece 4″ x 5.25″ for the main panel of my card.  I planned out where to lay the stencil to allow for a sentiment.  On the actual stencil, the short flower on the right of my card is actually on the left side of the stencil, with the tallest flower in the middle of the stencil.  I knew I could move the stencil around, and putting the smallest flower on the right gave me room for the sentiment I wanted to use.  I stamped the sentiment in the corner before adding the floral design.  I used washi tape to hold the stencil in place and to mask off areas where I didn’t want the compound to go.  Then I set the panel aside for a while to allow the compound to dry.  That didn’t take as long as I thought it would, so that was a nice surprise.  However… when I picked up the panel to dry fit it to the card base, I realized I’d made an oops.  Instead of working with the 4″ x 5.25″ piece of cardstock I’d cut, I’d used the other half.  After saying “Oh, crap!” a few times, and figuring I didn’t have enough time before the challenge closes to try it again, I knew I’d have to trim down the piece.  I held my breath while doing it because I was afraid the compound would crack, but thankfully, it held.  Unfortunately, trimming it down left me with less margins around the design than I would have liked.  But I guess it still looks OK.  I made a last-minute decision to round the opposing corners of the panel and the card base, to soften the look a bit.  In the end I think the card turned out all right, considering I wasn’t sure how the compound was going to behave.

LIM264

I’m thinking I’m going to have to play with this technique again some time!  Thanks for stopping by today.

Supplies:
Stamps: Sincere Salutations (Stampin’ Up)
Cardstock: River Rock (SU); Pure Luxury Ivory (Gina K. Designs)
Ink: River Rock (SU)
Other: Wildflower stencil (Tim Holtz); drywall compound (source unknown); corner rounder punch (EK Success)

5 Responses to “an experiment that pretty much worked”

  1. I think your card looks absolutely brilliant. No one would ever know you’d intended the margins to be different, and your idea of using drywall compound instead of embossing paste is very creative. I really like the ‘feel’ of this card and I think your design layout is really well balanced. Lovely work!

  2. WOW! that super elegant and yummy texture. Perfectly CAS and thanks for playing along at Less is More this week!
    Sarah x

  3. Your embossing looks so neat and crisp Patricia… fab card!
    Thanks so much
    Chrissie
    “Less is More”

  4. An absolutely gorgeous card!! Very cool technique, too.

  5. Sorry to be so late commenting, what a super texture card and such a clever technique with drywall!
    Thanks for joining our challenge
    Anne
    “Less is More”

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